Weightloss

What is The Atlantic Diet?

Listen up, dieters! There’s a new diet on deck that people are currently obsessed with. So it may be time to shake things up, update your shopping list, and have some tasty new meals in your weekly rotation to look forward to. We here at Eat This, Not That! spoke with Amy Goodson, MS, RD, CSSD, LD, a registered dietitian and certified specialist in sports dietetics who sits on our Medical Expert Board, who breaks down everything you need to know about the Atlantic Diet and its potential weight-loss benefits. Keep reading to learn more, and when you’re finished, check out Here’s How Much Water You Should Drink Every Day To Lose Weight.

What is the Atlantic Diet?

baked fish with veggies, concept of the Atlantic Diet for weight loss
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The Atlantic Diet is quite similar to the very popular Mediterranean Diet. “It has gained some popularity after a study found adherents to the diet had a significantly lower risk of chronic health problems,” explains Goodson.

This diet includes traditional foods enjoyed in northwest Portugal and Spain, Goodson adds. Both the Atlantic and Mediterranean Diets place a major emphasis on consuming fresh veggies, fruits, and three to four weekly servings of fish or lean meat. In addition, they both favor olive oil and a moderate consumption of wine.

One significant aspect that sets the Atlantic Diet apart from the MedDiet is that it includes brassicas, a group of veggies that includes cabbage, turnips, kale, turnip greens, and cauliflower. The Atlantic Diet includes more lean cuts of meat, dairy, and seafood as well. Goodson shares, “Food preparation in the Southern European region involves simple cooking techniques such as boiling, grilling, baking, and stewing.”

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How can the Atlantic Diet help you lose weight?

Bluefish
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The Atlantic Diet can positively impact your waistline and more, as Goodson explains, “The emphasis on consuming nutrient-dense foods can contribute to better weight management and reduced waist circumference, further lowering the risk of cardiovascular disease. Consuming more high-fiber and high-protein foods can help increase satiety, potentially helping people to manage portion sizes and consume fewer calories, leading to weight loss.”

In a recent study published in JAMA Network Open, 574 individuals were observed. Participants on the Atlantic Diet experienced smaller waistlines and less belly fat. In addition, according to Goodson, “The results show that adhering to this diet can lead to improvements in various risk factors associated with cardiovascular disease and metabolic syndrome.

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Is the Atlantic Diet more beneficial than the MedDiet for weight loss?

calorie deficit concept
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If you’re deciding between the Atlantic Diet or the Mediterranean Diet for weight loss, Goodson assures they’re pretty similar. “The Atlantic Diet focuses on minimally processed, fiber-rich, and bioactive-rich plant foods with potentially a little more lean protein variety,” she says. “The emphasis that both diets put on minimally processed foods, lots of vegetables, fruits, whole grains, beans, olive oil, and lean proteins can help an individual lose weight, but with both diets it’s important to remember that calorie intake must also be taken into consideration.

Losing weight is a result of creating a calorie deficit. This means that regardless of the diet you follow, there has to be a calorie reduction to result in weight loss. Keep in mind that it’s always an option to consult with a registered dietitian or download a food-tracking app to be mindful of the ideal calorie intake to achieve your weight-loss goal. Goodson recommends, “Consume those calories with the nutrient-rich foods recommended in the Atlantic and/or Mediterranean Diets to potentially see both weight loss and health benefits.”

Alexa Mellardo

Alexa is the Mind + Body Deputy Editor of Eat This, Not That!, overseeing the M+B channel and delivering compelling fitness, wellness, and self-care topics to readers. Read more about Alexa

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